Categories
FreeBSD

The Short List #8: Using #lldb with a core file on #FreeBSD

Debugging qemu this evening and it took me a minute or two to figure out the syntax for debugging a core file with lldb.

lldb mips-bsd-user/qemu-mips -c /mipsbuild/qemu-mips.core

Make sure you have permissions to access both the binary and the core, else you get a super unhelpful error of:

error: Unable to find process plug-in for core file ‘/mipsbuild/qemu-mips.core’

But, after that, you can start poking around:

Core file ‘/mipsbuild/qemu-mips.core’ (x86_64) was loaded.

Process 0 stopped

* thread #1: tid = 0, 0x00000000601816fa qemu-mips`_kill + 10, name = ‘qemu-mips’, stop reason = signal SIGILL

frame #0: 0x00000000601816fa qemu-mips`_kill + 10

qemu-mips`_kill + 10:

-> 0x601816fa: jb 0x60182f5c ; .cerror

0x60181700: ret

0x60181701: nop

0x60181702: nop

(lldb) bt

* thread #1: tid = 0, 0x00000000601816fa qemu-mips`_kill + 10, name = ‘qemu-mips’, stop reason = signal SIGILL

* frame #0: 0x00000000601816fa qemu-mips`_kill + 10

frame #1: 0x000000006003753b qemu-mips`force_sig(target_sig=<unavailable>) + 283 at signal.c:352

frame #2: 0x00000000600376dc qemu-mips`queue_signal(env=<unavailable>, sig=4, info=0x00007ffffffe8878) + 380 at signal.c:395

frame #3: 0x0000000060035566 qemu-mips`cpu_loop [inlined] target_cpu_loop(env=<unavailable>) + 1266 at target_arch_cpu.h:239

frame #4: 0x0000000060035074 qemu-mips`cpu_loop(env=<unavailable>) + 20 at main.c:201

frame #5: 0x00000000600362ae qemu-mips`main(argc=1623883776, argv=0x00007fffffffd898) + 2542 at main.c:588

frame #6: 0x000000006000030f qemu-mips`_start + 367

Edit:  The permission error on the core file is now more meaningful in later versions of llvm:

http://llvm.org/viewvc/llvm-project?view=revision&revision=240753

Categories
Embedded FreeBSD

Sometimes you have to sit down and write #FreeBSD documentation

When working on new projects or hacks, sometimes you just have to stop, think and start writing down your processes and discoveries. While working on bootstrapping the DLink DIR-825C1, I realized that I had accumulated a lot of new (to me) knowledge from the FreeBSD Community (namely, Adrian Chadd and Warner Losh).

There is a less than clear way of constructing images for these embedded devices that has an analogue in the Linux community under the OpenWRT project. Many of the processes are the same, but enough are different that I thought it wise to write down some of the processes into the beginning of a hacker’s guide to doing stuff and/or things in this space.

The first document I came up with was based on the idea that we can netboot these little devices without touching the on-board flash device. This is what you should use to get the machine bootstrapped and figure out where all the calibration data for the wireless adapters exist. This is crucial to not destroying your device. The wireless calibration data (ART) is unique to each device, destroying it will mean you have to RMA this device.

The second document I’ve created is a description of how to construct the flash device hints entries in the kernel hints file for FreeBSD. I found the kernel hints file to be cumbersome in comparison to the linux kernel way of using device specific C files for unique characteristics.

Its interesting stuff if you have the hankering to dig a bit deeper into systems that aren’t PC class machines.

Categories
FreeBSD

The Short List #6: Make the CD drive do something useful on #FreeBSD

Noted today that while grip could access the CD drive on my machine, clemetine-player and xfburn could not.

Figure out which device node your CD drive is with camcontrol:

camcontrol devlist | grep cd
at scbus4 target 0 lun 0 (cd0,pass2)

Simply add the following to /etc/devfs.conf and restart devfs to get access to the CD device:

perm /dev/cd0 0666
perm /dev/xpt0 0666
perm /dev/pass2 0666

Now bear in mind, that this means any user of your machine has access to the device now. Hopefully, on a desktop computer, you know all the users of your machine.

Categories
FreeBSD

Burning all the bridges. Cleaning up jails with ezjail-admin on #FreeBSD

I noted that my updates on my jail host didn’t actually do a delete-old/delete-old-libs during the basejail process:

ezjail-admin update -i

I tend to update my jails with my base host svn updates to -current, so there’s a bit of churn and burn with regards to old files and such. This came to a head today as my src.conf on the base host declares WITHOUT_NIS to conserve my limited space.

The python port checks for the existence of the yp binaries to determine whether or not to build NIS support. So, if the old binaries are lying around and support for NIS is removed from your system, python’s build will abort with something like the following:

Install them as needed.
====
====> Compressing man pages (compress-man)
===> Installing for python27-2.7.6_2
===> Checking if lang/python27 already installed
===> Registering installation for python27-2.7.6_2 as automatic
pkg-static: lstat(/var/ports/basejail/usr/ports/lang/python27/work/stage/usr/local/lib/python2.7/lib-dynload/nis.so): No such file or directory
*** Error code 74

I realized that even though my host system was fairly clean (I do port rebuilds after each upgrade and delete-old delete-old-libs following that), the basejail was still filled with obsoleted files.

A super dangerous and super effective way to clean that up is the following:
yes | make delete-old DESTDIR=/usr/jails/basejail
yes | make delete-old-libs DESTDIR=/usr/jails/basejail

Dangerous, because you have to realize that your deleting binaries and libraries that might still be in use if you haven’t recompiled your ports packages. Effective, because it will cleanup and purge a lot of things if you haven’t done it in a while.

This also led me to understand that the /etc/src.conf tuneables WITHOUT_* don’t *stop* the buildsystem from creating the binaries and libraries. It doesn’t seem to shorten your build time. It *will* allow you to purge them from your system at install time with the delete-old make targets.

Categories
FreeBSD

httperf tuning for #FreeBSD testing

Was playing around with httperf to excercise Apache / stunnel SSl benchmarks on FreeBSD this week and ran into the code that nerfs simultaneous connections down from the environment ulimit of maxfiles to the limit FD_SETSIZE as defined in <select.h>.

One can override this at compile time and push the system harder by passing in some ./configure foo:

env CC=”cc -DFD_SETSIZE=4096″

However, you will then be able to max out the number of ports in use very quickly if you try to use stunnel and apache in this configuration.  I noted that on our systems we raise the low port number and reduce the high port number for connections:

net.inet.ip.portrange.first=20000

net.inet.ip.portrange.last=49151

I set first down to 2000 and last up to 65534 for my testing.  This gives me quite a bit more ports to use in testing.  At this point I can run stunnel on 443 forwarding to apache on localhost:80 and get more than 8k simultaneous connections when using SSL accelerators on FreeBSD 10

 

Categories
FreeBSD

The short list #5: coredumping with sudo on #FreeBSD

Things I learned from a misbehaving pam module managing our sudo context at work.  sudo, for security, will not dump core files if it hits a segfault.  You need to tell the kernel to allow set uid root binaries to core dump *and* you have to let sudo know that its ok via a sudo.conf entry.

DO NOT LEAVE THESE AS DEFAULTS

kern.sugid_coredump: 1

/etc/sudo.conf –> Set disable_coredump true

ref –> http://www.sudo.ws/sudo.man.html